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Tag:Seton Hall
Posted on: December 22, 2011 10:55 am
Edited on: December 22, 2011 10:59 am
 

Seton Hall's new family atmosphere is working

By Jeff Goodman

No one was taking Seton Hall seriously. This was a team that had decent wins over VCU and St. Joe's and everyone else on its slate short of Northwestern, but it's body of work remained worthy of dispute. 

But on Wednesday night, Herb Pope & Co. went into Dayton, an extremely underrated venue in terms of difficult and hostile establishments, and came away with a victory. 

The Pirates now stand at 10-1. 

Pope, who was in a coma and nearly died less than two years ago, has returned to the form that once made him one of the most dominant big men in the country. Jordan Theodore is finally showing what many anticipated from him long ago, when he was a highly recruited player back in high school. 

And Kevin Willard finally has something to smile about. 

Seton Hall struggled last season to a 13-18 record in its first year of the post-Bobby Gonzalez Era. Pope wasn't himself as his near-death experience in April of 2010 and Willard was unable to control the cast of characters that Gonzo had assembled. But now guys like Jeremy Hazell, Jeff Robinson and Keon Lawrence are all history -- and it's a far more peaceful environment in South Orange, N.J. 

"It's a family environment now," Pope said. "That wasn't the case before. He (Gonzalez) wasn't a fatherly figure. He was all about basketball and it wasn't a learning atmosphere." 

Now, Pope said, he is actually able to talk to his head coach. Knock on the door and actually hold a conversation. 

"Every day I talk to Coach Willard," Pope said. "About life, family. He's helped me out so much. ... After what happened, he really helped me get back mentally." 

On top of last year's struggles on the court, Willard was getting crushed with his lack of recruiting prowess. As nearby Rutgers made headlines with Mike Rice's commitments, Willard was hammered for his inability to get it done off the court. 

While Willard hasn't stockpiled highly rated guys, sophomore forward and Czech native Patrik Auda and freshman guard Aaron Cosby were key in Wednesday's win at Dayton. Auda went for a career-high 18 points and Cosby finished with 13. 

"Those young guys are letting us lead," Pope said. "And feeding off us." 

Pope said that it's taken a while to adjust. He was getting used to a new coach a year ago while dealing with coming back from being in a hospital for nearly two months. 

"Last year it was just great to be alive," Pope said. "This year is my last go-around. I want to go out with a bang." 

Willard admitted that it wasn't an easy transition after he took the reigns, but that Pope has come so far in just about every area. 

"No one really understood how serious the heart ailment affected him last year. He was never physically right," Willard said. "He's playing like the best big man in the country right now -- and Jordan is playing like one of the best point guards."

It's hard to argue. Pope is averaging 21.4 points and 11.5 boards while Theodore is putting up 14.8 points and has 82 assists and just 29 turnovers. 

"It's no secret that these guys are the key to our team," Willard said.

Actually, the key may wind up being the young guys and also whether or not the Pirates can get enough off the bench. Currently, you've got the starting unit and just one player, freshman Haralds Karlis, that averages more than one point per game. 

After Friday's road contest at Longwood, we'll find out whether this Seton Hall team is legit or not. The Pirates start Big East play with Syracuse, West Virginia and UConn. 

"I know what's coming up," Willard said. "We're not getting happy just yet." 

"We haven't accomplished anything yet," added Pope. 

Maybe not, but people are actually talking about what Seton Hall is doing on the court. It's been a while since that was the case. 

Photo: US PRESSWIRE
Posted on: December 1, 2011 12:00 pm
 

Your SEC/Big East Challenge guide



By Matt Norlander


What do you want in a preview? I've been self-assigned (is that even possible?) to give you the rundown on all of the SEC and Big East games coming up over the next 72 hours, and I wasn't quite sure where to go with this. After all, these are early-December games, half of them are afterthoughts, and preview material is usually come-and-go outside of preseason and NCAA tournament talk.

So I looked at the games and decided I'll just give you whatever random thought comes off the top of my head. A conversational tone works best here, since there are no real true tilts of consequence involved outside of the fantastic ones going on Friday night Louisville and Syracuse. (I'll be at the latter.) If there's a stat sited, I do not have it memorized. Those I looked up. I'm not huge on predictions, so you won't find those here.

All this said, I do expect these 12 games to be better than what the ACC and Big Ten gave us Tuesday and Wednesday night, by the way. If you have any other curiosities that go beyond this post, check our SEC/Big East Challenge page, which has the history of this event and stats that go along with it.

Thursday

Providence at South Carolina (7 ET): Oh this is just bad. Providence is a few years away from true relevancy, and Darrin Horn is already coaching for his job at South Carolina. NEXT.

St. John's at Kentucky (7:30 ET): Wildcats get the Johnnies tonight, less than 48 hours before Carolina comes in. I'd say St. John's would have a chance, except they're playing Kentucky. Kind of a problem. SJU doesn't have one senior on its roster and head coach Steve Lavin will not be making the trip. Kentucky will be looking ahead to UNC, but the 'Cats should win by a minimum of 23.4 points.

Ole Miss at DePaul (9 ET): Have a sick interest in this game if for no other reason than I want to know how many people show up to watch it. Have to say, the fact these teams are a combined 9-2 is a welcomed surprise.

Georgetown at Alabama (9:30 ET): Best game of the night, period. Are you sure what Georgetown is yet? We do know the Hoyas take care of the ball very well. That early trend could be bucked in Tuscaloosa, though, because Alabama is on its way to being a top-five defensive team in the country. Teams are shooting a 35.7 effective field goal percentage against the Tide. Second-worst in the country.

Friday

Florida at Syracuse (7 ET): I'll keep this strictly to basketball, because I'm not sure how much I'll be able to do that one I get there to cover the game. Basically, I'm intrigued as hell. I love Bradley Beal's (right, with Billy Donovan) game. I'm still not sold on Florida's four-guard look, even if Patric Young gets his chances to play janitor when that happens. No Erik Murphy for the Gators means they're less dynamic. I like Syracuse is a really fun one. With the Orange, you're just never sure who's going to be the player that has the big game. Looks like someone's going to need to decidedly have a huge night to beat a team a lot of people like to make the Final Four.

Cincinnati at Georgia (7 ET): Car-wreck factor has be interested. When will Cinci start playing at a level that's indicative of the talent it has on this team? Georgia's in a third-gear year, I think.

Vanderbilt at Louisville (9 ET): What do you think about this one? Vanderbilt certainly not expected to win it (I haven't checked, but I'd put the Cards at about -4.5 here). Louisville's still not at full strength, nor is Vandy. Goodman's going to be at this game. I think this one adds up to little, even if it's nice in the moment. Because come late February, both these teams will have personnel on the floor that didn't play in this game. If Vandy/'Ville are vying for the 3-seed line and you want to give the winner of this the bid, by all means, but beyond that there won't be much long-term effect from this game. I think John Jenkins struggles in this one, too.

Auburn at Seton Hall (9 ET): Oh, get it out of my face, please.

Saturday

Arkansas at UConn (3:15 ET): The Hogs are without Marshon Powell and so I don't see how Mike Anderson's new team keeps this within 20. UConn's due for a really impressive, really big win. I want to see how Alex Oriakhi plays in front of the home crowd in Hartford. Oriakhi's been public with this playing-time situation. UConn will grow and stumble a little more in December, but I'm betting we're putting this team in the highest echelon by New Year's Day.

Pittsburgh at Tennessee (5:15 ET): I'd call this game the biggest true toss-up of any listed here. I'm down on Pitt this year in regard to most others. A win here would be very uplifting for Jamie Dixon's team. Same can be said for Cuonzo Martin at Tennessee, who's probably still punching the pillow after his Vols couldn't steal that game against Memphis in Maui.

LSU at Rutgers (7 ET): Just a couple of truly nondescript, non-enthralling 4-3 BCS conference teams. I think I'd rather put away my summer clothes into storage.

West Virginia at Mississippi State (9 ET): The final game of the Challenge, it's the kind of game MSU should win without controversy if it wants to be top-20 caliber. WVU is down, considerably down, this season. The Bulldogs have twice as much talent on this team -- and a lot more size, even if Denis Kilicli will bruise it up down low with Renardo Sidney and/or Arnett Moultrie. The flip side: Huggins has been known to get his team to steal wins in these kind of spots.

Photos: AP
Posted on: October 21, 2011 11:35 am
 

Notebook: Big East Media Day news and notes



By Jeff Borzello

NEW YORK – Conference media days are a dream for writers that want a lot of information and people in one place. Simply put, they provide a treasure trove of nuggets on each team in the league. There were too many leftovers in the notebook to leave out and not share with everyone. Here are some of the more interesting tidbits gathered on Wednesday at Big East Media Day.

- Notre Dame forward Tim Abromaitis was recently suspended for four games after the NCAA ruled on a violation he committed three years ago. “We tried to fight it, but a rule is a rule,” Abromaitis said. “I accepted it.”

- Who will replace Ben Hansbrough at the point guard spot? Sophomore Eric Atkins (above), who led the Big East in assist-to-turnover ratio last season. “He was our sixth man last year, but he’s ready to elevate his game,” Abromaitis said.

- Sophomore Jerian Grant received rave reviews for his work over the summer and in the early part of the fall. “He’s playing really well,” Abromaitis said. “He’s learning things as a player, moving without the ball, guarding his man. That’s what we’ll need him to do.”

- DePaul received three pieces of bad news in the past week. Junior forward Tony Freeland will miss the season with a shoulder injury, while freshman Montray Clemons is done for the year after rupturing a tendon in his knee. Moreover, the NCAA ruled freshman Macari Brooks ineligible. “We thought we were pretty deep,” head coach Oliver Purnell said. “We can’t afford any more injuries.”

- Purnell thinks Cleveland Melvin (right) is somewhat underrated on a national level, after averaging 14.3 points and winning Big East Rookie of the Year honors. “Probably so,” Purnell said. “He had a good freshman year and a really good summer.”

- Rutgers brought in a highly-touted freshman class – and the incoming guards are impressing early on. “Our guards have a little more experience than our big men,” forward Dane Miller said, pointing to Myles Mack and Jerome Seagears. Coach Mike Rice, however, thinks Eli Carter could make more of an impact than both of them. “He might lead my freshman in points per game.”

- Rice is impressed with Kansas State transfer Wally Judge. “He’s a physical specimen. He just has to develop that consistency.”

- Forward Kadeem Jack will likely be out until mid-January with a foot injury. Jack was looking like he would have a major impact in the frontcourt. “He’s somebody where the light was already on,” Rice said.

- Marquette forward Jae Crowder is pegging sophomore Vander Blue (right) as a true breakout performer. “He had a great summer, played in the Pro/Am, played for USA basketball,” Crowder said. “His confidence is up; last year, he lost confidence. A lot of pressure is on him.”

- Out of the freshmen, California native Juan Anderson has stood out the most to Crowder. “He’s athletic, he goes hard, has a great motor,” Crowder said. “Buzz [Williams] loves it, I love it.”

- Despite the loss of three starters from last season, West Virginia forward Kevin Jones thinks highly of this year’s team. “This is the most talented team I’ve been on,” he said – and that includes the Elite Eight group that had Da’Sean Butler and Devin Ebanks.

- Freshman point guard Jabarie Hinds was cleared to play late in the process, but he’s already been impressive. “He had to catch up,” Jones said. “But he’s looking real good, doing the right things.”

- With Czech Republican native Patrik Auda and Latvian guard Haralds Karlis in the fold, Seton Hall has taken a foreign turn recently. “It’s fun,” guard Jordan Theodore said. “I’m trying new foods, trying to teach them slang.”

- Fun fact: Auda knows five languages – Dutch, Spanish, Czech, English and Russian.

- Georgetown forward Hollis Thompson said the Hoyas still laugh about the infamous brawl in China over the summer. “It was a great bonding experience,” Thompson said.

- Roy Hibbert, Jeff Green, Dwyane Wade and other NBA players came back to Georgetown to work out during the lockout. Thompson said the one who benefitted the most was Henry Sims, who played against Hibbert on a regular basis.

Photo: US Presswire (Eric Atkins, Cleveland Melvin, Vander Blue)

Posted on: October 11, 2011 9:51 am
Edited on: October 11, 2011 10:58 am
 

Former Michigan State signee taking visits

By Jeff Goodman

Dwaun Anderson was Mr. Basketball in the state of Michigan. He's an athletic wing who was a freshman on campus this past summer and ready to play for Tom Izzo at Michigan State.

However, Anderson's mother died in the spring and the school put out a statement that he was withdrawing from school back in August.

"The last two years have been a very rough time for me as I’ve had to deal with some personal tragedies, including the sickness and death of my mother," Anderson said in the statement. "I’ve been in counseling as I attempt to cope with these issues, and I plan to undergo further counseling. I want to get all my personal issues in order before moving on to the next stage of my life."

Now the 6-foot-4 Anderson, who comes from a remote part of northern Michigan, is apparently prepared for the next stage and is exploring his options to return to college.

Anderson took an unofficial visit to Rutgers on Monday, is expected to go to Drexel today and will go to Wagner on Wednesday - a source told CBSSports.com. Georgetown is likely to get a visit from Anderson on Saturday and he is set to head to Seton Hall on Sunday. A trip to La Salle has been set up for Oct. 20. 

"He's wide open," the source said.

Anderson may also visit Villanova and Central Michigan.

Anderson played with Team NJABC in the summer because of the close relationship between Team NJABC coach Matt Pauls and Anderson's former high school coach at Suttons Bay in Michigan, Todd Hursey.

"He has a chance to be eligible in January," the source said. "And he'd be an unbelievable pickup for someone - especially this late."
Posted on: September 23, 2011 2:13 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 2:31 pm
 

Big East leadership questioned by coaches

By Jeff Goodman

Some guys just aren't cut out to be head coaches. They make better assistants.

Big East Commissioner John Marinatto may be one of those guys.

"I firmly believe we would manage this a lot better with a different leader," said one Big East head coach, speaking on the condition of anonymity. "He's a good man, a good right-hand man. But I think he's in over his head."

To be fair, Marinatto was thrust into an unenviable situation, following the late Dave Gavitt and Mike Tranghese as the leaders of the Big East.

Marinatto's resume reads as follows: A Providence kid who graduated from Providence College in 1979, then later went onto become the athletic director at the school for 14 years. He was the associate commissioner of the Big East from 2002-2009, when he took over for Tranghese.

"There's just no way it would have gotten to this point if Dave or Mike were still in charge," another Big East head man said.

One thing is for certain: Gavitt and/or Tranghese wouldn't have had the news of Syracuse and Pittsburgh's departure delivered to him in a football press box on Saturday - as has been reported to be the case with Marinatto.

"I'm not sure how it would have worked out, but it would have," a coach in the league said about the overall situation the league now finds itself.

``I doubt it," answered yet another when posed the question whether this would have occurred under previous leadership.

However, with Syracuse and Pittsburgh departing for the ACC at some point (likely prior to 2014) and UConn begging and pleading to join the exodus, Marinatto has come under fire.

While there are certainly those who are skeptical, Marinatto does still have his share of support.

"I think eventually this would have happened anyway," one coach said. "Everyone wants to put it on Marinatto, but this is a league that's been built on instability."

Now the future of the Big East - and the way it'll be comprised - is in jeopardy. Will it add a couple members to replace what is has lost - and may lose - and move forward? Or will it re-shape itself for improved long-term stability and go the route of the "basketball-only" schools, thus going hard after Xavier and Butler?

We'll see what Marinatto does - and whether his fate mirrors that of outgoing Big 12 commish Dan Beebe, who's at left of Marinatto in the photo above.

Photo: AP
Posted on: September 20, 2011 12:11 am
Edited on: September 20, 2011 12:14 am
 

Pirates face their fated reality without Anderson

By Matt Norlander

The saddest and most ironic thing about Kyle Anderson's commitment to UCLA, and not Seton Hall: it came on Talk Like a Pirate Day.

UCLA luring the Jersey native -- a top-five 2012 kid -- is a huge coup for Ben Howland. We predicted it was likely to happen, and indeed it did. A day before Anderson planned on announcing, to boot. The 6-8 St. Anthony’s point forward announced his decision on Twitter Monday night. We’ll get into what Anderson’s verbal commitment to UCLA means for that program and for Howland in the morning.

Tonight, can we talk about Seton Hall for a few? We don’t get a chance to do that much on the blog, but Kevin Willard missing out on Anderson is just as big for the Pirates as landing him was for the Bruins. Willard chased Anderson with all he had. Every game he and his staff could be at, they were there. I talked with Willard this summer at the Peach Jam during one of Anderson’s games. Normally, coaches casually make conversation and take their eyes off the court. Not Willard, at least not on that day. He was fixated on an AAU blowout like a 5-year-old waiting to blow out his birthday candles.

He put everything he had into getting Anderson in white and royal blue. The Pirates had never been so close, literally, to such a highly touted prospect. Anderson, who is probably the most dynamic player in this class, lives life a swift bike ride from SHU campus. And Willard couldn’t reel him. It’s not Willard’s fault; Anderson was courted by plenty of big names, and Seton Hall hasn’t had cache for huge recruits in well over a decade.

But it’s not going well for the Pirates right now, and that’s the grand and obvious observation. SHU is watching conference brethren bolt from the league like the cops just showed up at an underage party with liquor bottles all over the lawn. Who knows if the Big East even exists in five years. We know it won’t exist in the way it so briefly did for the past seven years, when it became the most powerful league in the history of college basketball.

Now Seton Hall is without a positive signal, an identity, heading forward. Borzello has mentioned the next three targets for the Pirates, two of whom they really need to convince to come to campus. The New York-area trio of Daniel Dingle, Kareem Canty and Jevon Thomas are now next on the list. Dingle is being considered by Rutgers, Dayton, Auburn and UMass. Canty has Xavier, Virginia and Florida State interested. Thomas is the lowest-ranked, and smallest, of the three.

These are the guys the future of Seton Hall’s program is relying upon. It’s unfortunate, but Willard gambled because he had to. You’ve got someone that good that close, you have to chase him with everything you’ve got. It’s an impossible situation for a coach like Willard at a school like Seton Hall. In many ways, and he’d never admit this publicly, Willard probably wishes Anderson lived a few hours rather than a few minutes away. That way, there’s no pressure to bring him in and sacrifice going after other recruits.

But now, with no Anderson and no 20-win season since 2004, Seton Hall looks about as hindered as any program could be in what’s currently becoming a pretty hindered, maligned conference.

Photo: US PRESSWIRE

Posted on: September 19, 2011 2:23 pm
 

Sources: Kyle Anderson leaning to UCLA

By Jeff Borzello

With only one day remaining until Kyle Anderson announces his future destination, neither he nor his camp are tipping their hand.

However, multiple sources tell CBSSports.com that one school has emerged as the leader heading into the final hours: UCLA.

Despite the distance from Anderson's home, the Bruins have been considered one of the favorites for much of his recruitment. Sources say that Anderson, a 6-foot-9 point guard/power forward hybrid from St. Anthony (N.J.), likes UCLA's reputation for producing pros and developing point guards. Anderson is ranked No. 4 in CBSSports.com's Top 100.

Anderson trimmed his list to five before the summer, with UCLA, Seton Hall, Florida, St. John's and Georgetown all believing they have a good shot at landing the talented New Jersey native. Anderson, who has played it close to the vest, hosted multiple in-home visits and went on five official visits.

CBSSports.com reported last week that St. John's fell way behind in the pecking order, while Georgetown has been considered the long shot for awhile. Florida attempted to make up ground in the last week with an in-home visit and official visit, but the Gators seem to be in third right now.

The only hold-up right now is Seton Hall head coach Kevin Willard's in-home visit with Anderson and his family Monday night. Willard will get the last chance to sway Anderson, and his pitch could be enough to change Anderson's mind.

For now, though, it seems the Bruins are in the driver's seat heading into the final stretch.

Photo: NJ.com
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: August 8, 2011 9:06 am
Edited on: August 8, 2011 9:08 am
 

Big East Offseason Report

By Jeff Goodman

Well, it’s just Jeff Borzello and I this week in this space – since Gary Parrish and Matt Norlander are out gallivanting somewhere.

That means, well, I’m going to have to try and pick it up a bit cause Borzello is busy with recruiting news and also trying to pick out a new wardrobe (I hope).

Anyway, here’s the Big East Offseason Report to get things started:

Big East Offseason Report

Cincinnati – The Bearcats will play in the Global Sports Shootout along with Marshall, Alabama State, Jacksonville State and Northwestern State. Mick Cronin’s team also has a non-league slate that includes contests at Georgia (12-2), at Xavier (12-10) and against Oklahoma.

Connecticut – Andre LaFleur left for Providence and Glen Miller was bumped up from director of basketball operations. Former GW head coach Karl Hobbs was brought on as the director of basketball administration. The defending champs will play in the Battle 4 Atlantis in the Bahamas (Nov. 23-27) and also have non-league games vs. Arkansas (12-3), vs. Harvard (12-7), vs. Fairfield (12-22) and at Tennessee (1-21). Jamal Coombs-McDaniel transferred to Hofstra.

DePaul – The Blue Demons will head to France from Aug, 11-21. Josh Postorino left for Georgia Tech and Andy Farrell was promoted to take his spot as the director of basketball operation. Matt Fleming is the new video coordinator. Oliver Purnell’s team will play in the Old Spice Classic in Orlando and its top non-conference game is at home against Ole Miss (12-1) in the Big East/SEC challenge. Mike Bizoukas (Missouri ) transferred out and freshman Shane Larkin left prior to the start of the season. Donnavan Kirk is eligible this season after transferring from Miami and sitting out last year.

Georgetown – The Hoyas brought former assistant Kevin Broadus back as a special assistant and also added former star big man Othella Harrington in some sort of role. John Thompson III & Co. will travel to China on Aug. 13 and will also play in the Maui Invitational. Georgetown has non-league games at Alabama (12-1) and at home against Memphis (12-22). Jerrelle Benimon (Towson) and Vee Sanford (Dayton) both left the program.

Louisville – Rick Pitino’s staff has a different look. Ralph Willard retired, Steve Masiello got the head job at Manhattan and Tim Fuller left after just one season for Missouri. Pitino brought his son, Richard, back from Florida – and added Kevin Keatts (Hargrave Military Academy) and Wyking Jones (New Mexico). Mark Lieberman is now the director of basketball operations. The Cardinals are heading to the Bahamas from Aug. 10-14 and have a non-league slate that includes games at Butler (11-19), against Vanderbilt (12-2), vs. Memphis(12-17) and at Kentucky (12-31). George Goode (Missouri) left while Luke Hancock (George Mason) transferred in and will sit out this season.

Marquette – The Golden Eagles will play in the Paradise Jam and also face Washington (12-6) in the Jimmy V Classic in NYC. Buzz Williams’ team will also play at Wisconsin (12-3), at LSU (12-19) and against Vanderbilt (12-29) at home in the non-conference schedule. Eric Williams (Sam Houston State) left the program and Jamil Wilson is eligible this season after sitting out last year following transferring in from Oregon.

Notre Dame – The Irish will play in the CBE Classic, will play Maryland (12-4) in the BT&T Classic and will also play Indiana (12-17) in the Crossroad Classic in Indianapolis. Mike Brey’s team will also face Gonzaga (11-30) at home in the non-league slate. Garrick Sherman (Michigan State) will sit out this season after transferring into the program.

Pittsburgh – Pat Skerry left to become the head coach at Towson and was replaced by Bill Barton (Marshall). The Panthers will play in the Hoop Group Classic (11-25/26) and also have a non-league game at Tennessee (12-3). J.J. Richardson transferred to Houston.

Providence – Ed Cooley brought Bob Simon and Brian Blaney with him from Fairfield and added Andre Lafleur (UConn). The final spot is now open after Carmen Maciariello left for BU. The Friars are in the South Padre Invitational and have non-conference games at South Carolina (12-1) and at home against BC (12-8). Duke Mondy and Dre Evans both left the program.

Rutgers – The Scarlet Knights will play in the Cancun Challenge (11-23/24) and also have non-league games at Miami (11-15), against LSU (12-3) and against Florida (12-29). Wally Judge transferred in from Kansas State and will sit out this season.

Seton Hall – Kevin Willard’s team will play in the Charleston Classic (11/17-20) and also have non-league games against Auburn (12-2), Wake Forest (12-10) and at Dayton (12-21). Anali Okoloji (George Mason) left the program while Brian Oliver (Georgia Tech) and Gene Teague (Southern Illinois) both transferred in.

St. John’s – The Red Storm will play in the Coaches vs. Cancer event in NYC on Nov. 17-18 and also have non-conference games at Kentucky (12-1) and against UCLA (2-18) at home. Dwayne Polee II transferred to San Diego State.

South Florida – Steve Roccaforte, the former head coach at Lamar, takes the spot of Jeremy Cox. The Bulls will play in the Hall of Fame Classic (11-19/20) and have non-league games at VCU (11-30), at Auburn (12-15) and at Kansas (1-3). Mike Burwell (Towson) and Shedrick Haynes both transferred out of the program.

Syracuse – Former Orange guard Adrian Autry (Virginia Tech) took the spot vacated when Rob Murphy got the head job at Eastern Michigan. Syracuse will play in the Preseason NIT and also has non-league games at N.C. State (12-17) and vs. Florida (12-2). Dashonte Riley left and transferred back home to Eastern Michigan.

Villanova – The Wildcats already left on a trip to France, Luxembourg and the Netherlands and will return on Aug. 16. Jay Wright’s staff had some movement as Chris Walker (Texas Tech) and Keith Urgo (Penn State) both left and were replaced by a couple of familiar faces: Doug West and Billy Lange (head coach at Navy). ‘Nova will play in the 76 Classic in Anaheim and the Wildcats have a non-league game at Temple on Dec. 10.

West Virginia – Bob Huggins’ team just left on a trip to Italy and will return on Aug. 21. Jerrod Calhoun was promoted to an assistant coach and Billy Hahn was reassigned to the assistant to the head coach. The Mountaineers will play in the Las Vegas Classic (12-22/23) and have non-league contests at Mississippi State (12-3), against Kansas State in Wichita (12-8) and vs. Miami (12-11). Dalton Pepper (Temple) and Dan Jennings (Long Beach State) both transferred out while Juwan Staten (Dayton) and Aaric Murray (La Salle) came into the program. Kevin Noreen (BC) is eligible to play this season after sitting out last year. 

Offseason reports: Big 12 Pac-12 | Big Ten | ACC

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com